Thai Sweet Sausage
Thai Sweet Sausage
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This is the Thai version of Chinese Sausage. This is a mildly sweet, air dried sausage, and is not cured, and needs to be fully cooked before eating. Two ways to dry this will be explained.
Thai Sweet Sausage
Yum
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
This is the Thai version of Chinese Sausage. This is a mildly sweet, air dried sausage, and is not cured, and needs to be fully cooked before eating. Two ways to dry this will be explained.
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. If using hog casings packed in salt, you will need to soak and rinse them following the suppliers instructions. If using dry hog casing, set them aside until needed, the just need a minute or two in water and can be used. You can also use collagen casings if you prefer.
  2. Add everything to a mixing bowl, except the sausage casings, mix together well using your hands. Cover and place in the fridge for 1 hour.
  3. Prepare your casings and using your preferred method, stuff the casings. Tie into about 6 to 8 inch links.
For Air Drying
  1. Wrap the sausage in parchment paper and leave in the hot sun for 3 days to dry out (like on a window ledge, but out of reach of cats or dogs.) When dried out and firm, store in a sealed bag in the fridge.
For Oven Drying
  1. Place the sausage on a parchment paper lined baking sheet and place in a 80 C (175 F) oven for 3-4 hours or until the sausage is firm. When dried out and firm, store in a sealed bag in the fridge.
To Cook
  1. The sausage will be quite firm. If to your going to use is a stir fry, best to steam the sausage for about 5-10 minutes to soften it up.
  2. You can also just place on rice in your rice cooker and cook the rice as normal, this will lightly flavor the rice and cooks the sausage through for a light meal.
Recipe Notes

Low cost.

 This recipe for Thai Sweet Sausage is adapted from Appon's Thai Food.

Isaan Sausage (Sai Krok) II
Isaan Sausage (Sai Krok) II
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This type of sausage originates in the northeastern area of Thailand, the Isaan region, and Laos and is very popular throughout the north as well. This is a mild sausage, good garlic and black pepper taste. You can ferment this at room temp for 2-3 days or if you are not comfortable doing that, you can store in the fridge for 2-3 days. Fermentation is not necessary to do, feel free to simple prepare these and grill and there is a few ways to do that as well. This version uses common ingredients. You will need casings and string.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 20 minutes
Passive Time
2-3 days
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 20 minutes
Passive Time
2-3 days
Isaan Sausage (Sai Krok) II
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Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
This type of sausage originates in the northeastern area of Thailand, the Isaan region, and Laos and is very popular throughout the north as well. This is a mild sausage, good garlic and black pepper taste. You can ferment this at room temp for 2-3 days or if you are not comfortable doing that, you can store in the fridge for 2-3 days. Fermentation is not necessary to do, feel free to simple prepare these and grill and there is a few ways to do that as well. This version uses common ingredients. You will need casings and string.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 20 minutes
Passive Time
2-3 days
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 20 minutes
Passive Time
2-3 days
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. For the pork, you can use ground pork, but if you are grinding yourself, pork shoulder, or preferred would be pork belly minus the skin. Use the wagon plate (coarse plate) for a nice mince.
  2. If using hog casings packed in salt, you will need to soak and rinse them following the suppliers instructions. If using dry hog casing, set them aside until needed, the just need a minute or two in water and can be used. You can also use collagen casings if you prefer.
  3. Peel the garlic and mince well.
  4. Add the ground pork, minced garlic, rice, salt, and pepper to a large mixing bowl. Using your hands, get in there and mix well.
  5. Using the method of your choice, stuff the sausage casings. Once stuffed, use sting tie off the sausage into 1 1/2 inch links. Do not twist the links, just use the string and tie, tightly.
  6. Once everything is tied tightly, you can either cook now, or leave to ferment for a few days. The fermentation happens with the salt and rice.
  7. To ferment, use the fridge, there is less chance of spoilage of the pork. Place the sausage in a large bowl and cover with plastic wrap, place in the fridge for 2-3 days.
  8. The fermenting is not really needed, you can prepare the sausage and grill the same day, no harm.
  9. You can taste the sausage mixture and adjust as needed by first pan frying a small amount or microwaving a small amount.
To Cook on a Charcoal Grill
  1. After you have lit your charcoal, and get a nice bed of coals, cover the grill with foil, place the sausage on the foil and cook until cooked through and juices run clear.
To Cook in an Oven
  1. Preheat your oven to 180 C (350 F). Line a baking sheet with foil.
  2. Steam the sausages in a steamer until nearly cooked through. Use any steaming method you prefer.
  3. Place the sausage on the baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes or until nicely browned, then turn them over and bake for another 5 minutes or until nicely browned all over.
  4. Remove to a plate and cut them apart where the strings are tied (remove the bits of string as well).
  5. Serve with fresh sliced cucumber, celery, lettuce or cabbage, and chilies. Enjoy.
Recipe Notes

Ground pork will cost about 85 Baht/800 grams. For 6 servings, this is about 45 cents per serving.

Adapted from an internet recipe.