Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup

Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup
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Condensed cream soups are used in a range of recipes. With this shortcut you know exactly what is in it. This can be frozen for up to 6 months or stored in the fridge for several days. This makes the equivalent of 1 can of condensed soup.
Servings Prep Time
1 can 2 minutes
Cook Time
3 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 can 2 minutes
Cook Time
3 minutes
Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup
Yum
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Condensed cream soups are used in a range of recipes. With this shortcut you know exactly what is in it. This can be frozen for up to 6 months or stored in the fridge for several days. This makes the equivalent of 1 can of condensed soup.
Servings Prep Time
1 can 2 minutes
Cook Time
3 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 can 2 minutes
Cook Time
3 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: can
Instructions
  1. Whisk together in a microwave safe glass container no less that 1 qt in size. Microwave on HIGH for 3 minutes until very thick, stopping to whisk mixture after each minute. Microwave ovens vary wildly so it may take longer in yours. Just keep cooking and whisking every so often until it gets thick. Add chopped chicken.
  2. Alternatively, you may pour whisked mixture (see notes) into a saucepan or skillet and cook on medium low on top of the stove until thickened. If you are unfortunate enough to find lumps in your soup, pour it through a strainer. Add finely chopped chicken.
Recipe Notes

You can use fresh milk instead of evaporated (never sweetened condensed milk), but it will not hold up to prolonged cooking or freezing like the evaporated milk does.

If you choose to make this on the stove, I recommend you mix it in a blender first, OR plan to push it through a strainer when it has been cooked. The chicken base doesn't seem to dissolve as readily as it does in the microwave so blending it first results in a creamier product.

Be advised that microwave ovens vary wildly. If your soup doesn't thicken after 3 minutes, keep cooking and stirring every minute until it does.

Most recipes will just call for a can of condensed soup, some recipes (or if you just want to make the soup by itself) call for 1 can of water. One can equals 1 1/4 cups of water. But as a healthier alternative to using water, try using whey if you recently made cottage cheese, or water used to boil potatoes. Milk can also be used in place of water to make a creamier soup.

Used in Recipes Listed on this Site:
Crockpot Chicken and Dumplings III,
Slow Cooker Angel Chicken & Pasta,
King Ranch Chicken Casserole,
Mexican Casserole,
Chicken Noodle Casserole,
Slow Cooker Sausage & Potatoes II,
Swiss Chicken Supreme,
Chicken Casserole,
Chicken & Dumpling Casserole, Made it, GO-TO recipe,
Crockpot Chicken and Dumplings II,
Ultra Creamy Mac & Cheese, Made it, GO-TO recipe,
Slow Cooker Creamy Ranch Chicken,
Easy Chicken Pot Pie,
Crock Pot Cream Cheese Chicken,
No Crust Chicken Pot Pie II,
Crockpot Italian Chicken,
Slow Cooker Cheesy Chicken And Rice,
Chicken Noodle Soup,
Chicken Rice Soup,
Creamy Chicken Cordon Bleu Casserole I,
Dizzy's Chicken,
One-pot Creamy Smoked Chicken Penne,
Easy Cheesy Slow Cooker Chicken,
Slow Cooker Creamy Italian Chicken,
Slow Cooker Golden Chicken,
Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Casserole,
Slow Cooker Chicken and Gravy, Made it,
Creamy Swiss Chicken Casserole,
Creamy Italian Chicken, Made it,
Chicken, Broccoli, & Pasta Skillet,
Slow Cooker Chicken Stroganoff,
Cheater Chicken Cordon Bleu, Made it, GO-TO recipe,
No Crust Chicken Pot Pie I, Made it, GO-TO recipe,
Slow Cooker Salisbury Steak III,
Slow Cooker Ham & Potato Dinner,
Breakfast Potato Casserole,
Tuna Bake,
Tetrazzini Bake
,

Adapted from an internet recipe.

Processed or Prepared

This is a good topic, many get it confused. Just because something is canned, does not mean it is “processed”. I have several examples here to describe these terms.

Processed. Think processed cheese slices, they are so processed, they cannot even be called cheese! Cheese Slices, Processed Cheese Food, things like that, it is closer to plastic than it is cheese. If the ingredients are more than 3 items (milk, rennet, salt) then you are talking about processed cheese.

Processed. Think canned condensed soups (I have another post on this site about that), The main ingredient in condensed soups is water, the label states less than 2% milk, the shortcuts I have for condensed soups, the main ingredient is evaporated milk, world of change there.

Prepared. Think canned beans. Nearly every time, this is beans, water, and salt. Think about it this way, if you take dry beans (like canneries do), and cook them in water (like canneries do), and add a pinch of salt (like you and I would do), that is a prepared beans, not processed. If you cook beans, you do the same exact thing minus the can. There is basically no differences in nutrition between canned and dry beans. Prepared would be also be canned vegetables or even frozen vegetables. You may pay a higher price due to the cutting of the vegetables and canning. I keep canned vegetables on hand for emergencies.

Prepared. Think canned tuna. I like tuna but I do buy them whole and cook myself, cheaper than canned, but it is the same, it is just cooked fish. You can make more cans of tuna from a 16-18 inch tuna for half the price. I keep canned tuna on hand for emergencies.

Cups in a Soup Can

This seems like an odd post, but it is a valid question, “how many cups are in a regular size can of condensed soup?”

I make nearly all of the condensed soups I need from scratch, not only is it healthier, it is more economical. The shortcuts for condensed soups I have listed on this site make about the same amount as a can of condensed soup. Most of the recipes that I use condensed soup in require one or two cans, and the quantity is not important so I make a “can” of home made condensed soup and use that, if more than one can is needed, I make it in batches of one “can” at a time.

Some recipes are very detailed as to how much condensed soup to use (or gravy or broth or consomme, most of which come in similar sized cans). Gravy, broth, and consomme shortcuts are also listed on this site.

So the answer to the question, it is 1 1/4 cups = 1 regular soup can.

Why are some items not used in recipes?

I have been asked this a few times, “why are some items not used in recipes that I list?” Well that is easy, 1, not everything is available where I live, and 2, processed items are kept to a minimum. I like to stick to healthy, readily available fresh ingredients than processed. Now, do I use processed, yep, I do but there is a limit. One reason is to keep food on hand for emergencies, you need to rotate that stock, so use it in a recipe.

What I do list as processed, and I have shortcuts to make these as well are, condensed soups, salad dressings, cheese, and spice mixes. The difference with what I list and the processed product is that you know what is in the final product. Salt being a major issue.

Recipes I will not add include frozen pie crusts, packaged rolls or biscuits in a tube that pop when you open, or items like canned diced tomatoes, sliced mushrooms, etc. I do in fact keep canned tomatoes on hand as well as mushrooms, but it takes me seconds to dice or slice these, to pay for sliced anything in can, you are paying too much. The more an item is handled, the higher the cost.

Cooking spray, no way do I add cooking spray to a recipe! Do some research, if you need to grease pan for baking, use some butter, healthier than the chemicals in the cooking spray.

I am a realist, I do not expect to live to 120 with my cooking, nor would I want that! Things to consider, is butter better than margarine? Yes. When baking, is lard better than butter, well that depends, neither one is more harmful than margarine or heaven forbid, palm oil. Butter and lard are both natural, takes a bit of work to get oil out of a palm fruit.

One of the benefits of this site is show uses for fresh foods, like peppers, onions (I recently seen that diced onion and diced peppers are available in the states, frozen! How lazy is that!), potatoes, carrots, beans, numerous fresh vegetables. Do I use frozen vegetables, yes, once in a while, it is not standard practice. Will I use frozen Hash Browns, no. Will I use frozen peas, carrots and corn? Yes, once in a blue moon and that is to test a recipe as written, then I will try and adjust to fresh products.

“There is more chicken recipes than beef and pork recipes” Yes, chicken is widely available, and free range, pork is as well as beef if local, but must know where it is coming from.

“Is pork unhealthy considering the fat compared to chicken?” Well, look at most chicken and you should trim the fat. But at the same time, you can get a nice pork loin for a roast that has little fat. Cannot make a good stock with out fat as well. Again, I am not looking to extend my age by the way I eat but I can cut some of the extra items out.

Easy Chicken Tetrazzini II

Easy Chicken Tetrazzini II
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Sounds good. Several cooking methods used but ultimately this will be a baked casserole.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 1 hour
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 1 hour
Cook Time
45 minutes
Easy Chicken Tetrazzini II
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Sounds good. Several cooking methods used but ultimately this will be a baked casserole.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 1 hour
Cook Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 1 hour
Cook Time
45 minutes
Ingredients
For the Chicken & Broth
Remaining Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. To make the broth, add the chicken, onion, carrot, and celery to a large pot with the 7 cups of water. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer, cook for about 20-30 minutes. Remove the pot from the burner and let it cool to room temp on its own, this will give good tender and juicy chicken.
  2. Once cooled, remove the chicken to a cutting board.
  3. Pour the liquid in the pot through a strainer, discard contents of the strainer, return the broth to the same pot. Now you have fresh homemade broth, wasn't that simple and easy?
  4. Preheat your oven to 190 C. Butter a 9x13 baking dish and set that aside.
  5. Bring the broth to a boil and add the pasta and cook until it is just tender. Remove the pot from the burner and let sit for 5 minutes.
  6. While the pasta is sitting (it is soaking up flavor), go ahead and cut the chicken into bite size pieces, set aside.
  7. In a large mixing bowl, add the two soups, garlic and onion powders, and half the cheese. Mix together. Now you are ready to put this together.
  8. Drain the pasta. Place half the pasta in the baking dish and spread out to an even layer.
  9. Layer half the chicken on top.
  10. Spread half the soup mixture on the top.
  11. Repeat the layers then sprinkle the remaining cheese on the top. Cover with foil and bake for 45 minutes.
  12. Remove from oven, let rest for 5 minutes, serve with a salad for a nice meal.
Recipe Notes

Three good sized chicken breasts might, just might, cost 65 Baht. Without running the numbers, this is a Low Cost meal for sure.

Shortcuts: Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup, Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup.

Provided courtesy of good friend, Stephen Connell.
United States.

Crab Bisque

Crab Bisque
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Sounds, and reasonable enough to use imitation crab for cost saving instead of lump crap, which is what I will do the first time I make this to verify the consistency of the bisque. There is several shortcuts for additional savings. Links to the shortcuts are listed in the Recipe Notes section.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Crab Bisque
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Sounds, and reasonable enough to use imitation crab for cost saving instead of lump crap, which is what I will do the first time I make this to verify the consistency of the bisque. There is several shortcuts for additional savings. Links to the shortcuts are listed in the Recipe Notes section.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. In a large sauce pan, mix together the milk, soups, and cream, bring to a boil stirring often, then reduce to a simmer.
  2. Stir in the crab meat and warm through.
  3. Serve garnished with chives sprinkled on top and crackers or bread on the side.
Recipe Notes

I will price this when I either pick some fresh crabs (cheapest way) or buy lump crab meat frozen. This should be easily low cost.

Shortcuts: Condensed Cream of Asparagus Soup, Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup.

Adapted from an internet recipe.

Tomato Beef Country Casserole

Tomato Beef Country Casserole
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Sounds really good, on my to make list. There is several shortcuts that will save you money as well with this recipe. Links to the shortcuts are listed in the Recipe Notes section.
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
20-30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
20-30 minutes
Tomato Beef Country Casserole
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Sounds really good, on my to make list. There is several shortcuts that will save you money as well with this recipe. Links to the shortcuts are listed in the Recipe Notes section.
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
20-30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
20-30 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 180 C and lightly grease a 9x13 baking dish with butter. Cook the egg noodles or pasta in a pot of boiling water until just tender, then drain.
  2. Brown the ground beef and onion in a skillet with salt, pepper, and garlic powder to your liking, drain well, set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, mix the soups, milk, Worcestershire sauce, and additional pepper if you like. Add the cooked and drained ground beef and cooked and drained egg noodles or pasta, stir to combine. Pour this into your baking dish and top with the cheese.
  4. Bake for 20-30 minutes or until the cheese browned and bubbly, remove from the oven and let cool for a few minutes, then serve.
Recipe Notes

Figure about 100 Baht for beef, cheese figure about 140 Baht for 1 cup. Make the soup yourself for additional savings. For 8 servings, this is about 89 cents per serving.

Shortcuts: Condensed Tomato Soup, Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup.

Adapted from an internet recipe.

Easy Cheesy Slow Cooker Chicken

Easy Cheesy Slow Cooker Chicken
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Sounds good! I need to try this. I cannot stress the importance of making the shortcuts for the soups. On my to make list. Links to the shortcuts are listed in the Recipe Notes section.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
6-8 hours
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
6-8 hours
Easy Cheesy Slow Cooker Chicken
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Sounds good! I need to try this. I cannot stress the importance of making the shortcuts for the soups. On my to make list. Links to the shortcuts are listed in the Recipe Notes section.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
6-8 hours
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time
6-8 hours
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Sprinkle both sides of the chicken salt and pepper and place in your slow cooker.
  2. Mix the soups together and pour over the chicken. For cheesier sauce, use 2 cans of cheese soup and 1 can of chicken soup.
  3. Cover and cook on Low setting for 6 to 8 hours or until the chicken is cooked through. If in doubt, use a meat thermometer to check for an internal temp of 74 C.
  4. Serve over hot rice or pasta, sprinkle sliced spring onion on top for garnish and add color.
Recipe Notes

Chicken breasts run about 100 Baht/kilo, that should be about 6 breasts. The soup per can is on average 52 Baht, 3 cans would be 156 Baht, if you make these using the shortcuts, the cost is 21 Baht per can, making the soup cost about 63 Baht, plus a bit more for the chicken and cheese needed, so I will say 75 Baht for the soup made from shortcuts. For 6 servings this works out to about $1.25 per serving if using canned soup. If using soups made from the shortcuts, for 6 servings, this comes out to about 86 cents per serving.

Shortcuts: Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup, Condensed Cheddar Cheese Soup.

Adapted from an internet recipe.

Products I Buy and Don’t Buy

This is my standard list of the most common things I buy and don’t buy. Common items, such as eggs and milk are not listed.

Products I Buy

Dry beans – I can make refried beans, chili beans, baked beans (pork and beans), and various soups and chilies. It does take time to cook and prepare these, ingredients list on a bag of dry beans is just beans. I keep a stock of Red Kidney beans, Pinto beans, Black beans, and Great Northern beans.

Potatoes – I can make hash browns, mashed potatoes, potato salad, use in soups and stews, french fries, fried potatoes, etc. Healthy, it is a potato, nothing more. I also leave skins on except for my potato salad which is just personal preference.

Evaporated Milk – I use this for making condensed cream of whatever soups for use in various recipes. Takes about 5 minutes to make cream of mushroom (plus you can decide on types of mushrooms and amount used), cream of celery soup or cream of chicken soup. (Condensed milk is normally sweetened so I avoid that unless a recipe calls for it.)

Real Cheese – I buy this in blocks, Cheddar, Swiss, and Edam, these come from New Zealand, and the ingredients are milk and rennet, nothing more. Can be sliced or shredded, and real cheese will melt much much better than packaged shredded cheese. Cheeses are used in many of my recipes listed on this site. The Thai produced cheese I use is Cream Cheese, Mozzarella, and Parmesan, all good quality at half the price of imported. For Cottage cheese, I make that myself from whole milk and some vinegar, easy.

Dry Pasta – Just the pasta, not the prepackaged meals. Pasta is cheap, stores well and for a long time, useful in many recipes on this site as well as for side dishes. I keep a good stock of pasta on hand.

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables –  You know exactly what you are getting, fresh. If making a stew, nothing is better than fresh potatoes, carrots, celery, etc.

Tomato Paste – I normally have about 20 cans on hand, used to make tomato sauce for pizzas, for pasta, soup, ketchup, and even juice to just drink and enjoy or for making a good hearty chili. Very versatile.

Spices – Most of these I buy in the small bottles but for regularly used items, I buy in large bags, not only does it cut down the price, there is less packaging. There is many spice mixes you can make if you have a large variety of spices available.

Pre-made Spice Packets – I do buy the Thai made, particularly Lobo brand spice packets for things such as chicken and rice, northern Thai sausages, Chinese five spice, and even gravy mixes.

Canned Whole Tomatoes – Used in a variety of dishes from Chili to some skillet dishes, and even as a base for salsa, which is excellent. I keep these stocked as they are almost as versatile as tomato paste. Reason for the canned is during the rainy season we cannot get to the market for fresh tomatoes.Canned tomatoes are excellent for tenderizing beef as well.

Tuna – I like canned tuna and I keep that stocked at the house for emergency use. Fresh tuna, now we are talking! Want a great tuna salad sandwich, use fresh tuna, making a tuna and noodle casserole, use fresh tuna. One can of tuna, which the ingredients are normally tuna and water (or tuna and oil) is about 30 to 45 Baht a can, a fresh whole tuna is about 40-60 Baht each. One fresh tuna will make about 2-3 cans of canned tuna, without the can or waste. One can of tuna, on average, is 1/2 cup of tuna.

Frozen or Canned Vegetables – Used in many recipes. For canned veggies, I do stock some items for emergency use but mainly buy when I need a particular item. Canned or frozen vegetables are basically prepared items, not processed.

Canned beans – Although convenient, canned beans for the most part are just beans, water, and some salt, we do keep canned pork and beans for emergency use.

Products I Don’t Buy

Frozen Hash Browns, Tater Tots, and Fries – All very convenient, all very processed. Tater Tots are hash browns with natural flavoring added. Adding natural flavoring to a product that is supposed to be potatoes just does not seem right. I have been known to use frozen fries once in a while but that is rare. Hash browns, dead easy to make.

Cream of Anything Soups – Convenient but highly processed, and are mainly made of water flavored to taste like the soup. There is lass than 2% cream in these soups, then if you just wanted to make a pot of soup with these, you have to add a can of water as well, so you are watering down a water based product. Doesn’t make sense.

Processed Cheese – Probably the most hideous product ever created, it is basically a soft plastic and most of it cannot even be called cheese, has to be called Singles, Slices, etc. I have not bought processed cheese in over 10 years.

Prepackaged Pasta Meals – Think Kraft Mac and Cheese, Cheddar cheese is not supposed to be glow in the dark orange! And most packages like this use powdered cheese, that just does not even sound good!

Tomato Sauce / Spaghetti Sauce / Pizza Sauce – These are easily made from paste, you control the spices, salt and sugar. No need to stock these, I just stock tomato paste.

packetPre-made Spice Packets – Think imported Taco Seasoning or Cajun Seasoning or even Stew Seasoning to name a few. Not only are these are heavily processed items, they are also expensive as well compared to what you can make from a shortcut on this site. Spice packets are well know to be heavy on the salt as well. This is the ingredients for a common taco seasoning packet, the 3rd ingredient is Maltodextrin, right after, you guessed it, salt. I have no imported prepackaged spice packets in the house.

Cottage Cheese – For starters, this is not available where I live unless I go up to the city (50 km away) and it is also very expensive. Three liters of whole milk, some vinegar, and a bit of time and you can make 3 cups of Cottage cheese, dead easy and foolproof.

Sour Cream – Think strained yogurt and you have sour cream, it is that easy. A little yogurt size cup is about 150 Baht, yogurt is much much less for 4 yogurt cups, makes a lot of our cream.

Salsa – I make mine from scratch using canned whole tomatoes as the base, half the cost of jarred salsa.

Tartar Sauce – I make mine from a shortcut on this site, well less than half the cost of prepared tartar sauce, and you know what goes in it.

Pickles – I make refrigerator pickles, very simple recipe listed on this site, foolproof. Reuse jars with lids you already have instead of paying a much higher cost for a jar of pickles, since you are paying for packaging.

Mushrooms

indexFor fans of mushrooms, Thailand is a great place!!! We stock canned button mushrooms for emergencies, but our go to mushrooms are a variety pack from Tesco! Normally 3-4 kinds of mushrooms in the pack, costs about 20-30 Baht for what would be a good handful chopped, so we normally use 2 packs per dish I make. If I make a homemade tomato based spaghetti sauce or a cream/cheese sauce, mushrooms are in there for sure.

Some mushrooms fare better than others and all have different textures. Here is some commercial cultivated Japanese edible mushroom species grown here in Thailand. Here is some examples. These are what I like, the oyster, ear, and wood mushrooms I am not a fan of.

Clockwise from the left in the picture above, Enoki, in the US these may be called Golden Mushroom. Don’t let the thin size tell you they turn to mush in a soup, they mushrooms make a great mushroom soup and retain a lot of crunchiness to them, they are very good.

Buna-shimeji, (brown type) the Thai name I do not know, we use these in a lot of pasta sauces simply chopped up and added to the sauce. We use these with the next one. My mushroom of choice when making Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup.

Bunapi-shimeji, (white type) another one I do not know the Thai name of, Tesco usually lists the Japanese, really. Great chopped up in a pasta sauce, either tomato based or cream/cheese based, excellent addition.

King oyster mushroom (Eryngii) is a favorite for omelets. Consistency is like a button mushroom, but much much larger as you can tell. Dice up 1-2 for a 3 egg omelet and you have a good breakfast right there.These are also excellent fried as they do not shrink or wilt up like other mushrooms. These can be displayed with either the English or Japanese name.

Shiitake is the Japanese standard for soups, even used on burgers if you can find large ones.

Straw MushroomsStraw Mushrooms are my favorite for soups or large pieces of mushrooms. These are delicious and and retain their size during cooking. These are sliced just in half lengthwise or even quartered lengthwise, slicing the other way would end up with chopped mushrooms. Any good Thai soups will have these in that.

Button Mushrooms, to tell you the truth, I have only seen fresh in Makro, canned is stocked in Tescos, never fresh, but we do keep canned in stock as well for emergencies. If you want a good mushroom for a pizza, you cannot beat a button mushroom.